google88649e1909430392 Tattoo Shops, Tattoo Kennesaw, Tattoo Marietta, Tattoo Canton, Tattoo Hiram, Tattoo Atlanta
 
This year and going into next year Planet Ink Tattoos has made a commitment to give back to the community. 
We are running specials like Toys for Tats and working with our Partners at Friends to the Forlorn.
Each Planet Ink location has sponsored and adopted a Pitbull from Friends to the Forlorn to help a cause we believe in. The special dog each shop sponsors/adopts is one that may never find a home. 
We believe in our community and we believe in giving back. Whether it be needy children or dogs in need of love. Planet Ink Tattoos is there for them.
Please join us in our quest to help and check out our partners at Friends to the Forlorn and stop by and make a toy donation to ANY Planet Ink Tattoo location.
 
 
America's core cultural reference books, professional journals, newspapers and magazines recognize tattooing as a well-established art form that, over the last three decades, has undergone dramatic changes. In the 1970s, artists trained in traditional fine art disciplines began to embrace tattooing and brought with them entirely new sorts of sophisticated imagery and technique. Advances in electric needle machines and pigments provided them with new ranges of color, delicacy of detail and aesthetic possibilities. The physical nature of many local tattooing establishments also changed as increasing numbers of operators adopted 

Once a taboo practice largely confined to sailors and street hoodlums, tattooing has evolved into a highly prized fashion product for celebrities and millions of middle-class consumers.
equipment and procedures resembling those of medical clinics -- particularly in areas where tattooing is regulated by government health agencies.
The cultural status of tattooing has steadily evolved from that of an anti-social activity in the 1960s to that of a trendy fashion statement in the 1990s. First adopted and flaunted by influential rock stars like the Rolling Stones in the early 1970s, tattooing had, by the late 1980s, become accepted by ever broader segments of mainstream society. Today, tattoos are routinely seen on rock stars, professional sports figures, ice skating champions, fashion models, movie stars and other public figures who play a significant role in setting the culture's contemporary mores and behavior patterns.

During the last fifteen years, two distinct classes of tattoo business have emerged. The first is the "tattoo parlor" that glories in a sense of urban outlaw culture; advertises itself with garish exterior signage; offers "pictures-off-the-wall" assembly-line service; and often operates with less than optimum sanitary procedures.

The second is the "tattoo art studio" that most frequently features custom, fine art design; the ambiance of an upscale beauty salon; marketing campaigns aimed at middle- and upper middle-class professionals; and "by-appointment" services only. Today's fine art tattoo studio draws the same kind of clientele as a custom jewelry store, fashion boutique, or high-end antique shop.

The market demographics for tattoo services are now skewed heavily toward mainstream customers. Tattooing today is the sixth-fastest-growing retail business in the United States. The single fastest growing demographic group seeking tattoo services is, to the surprise of many, middle-class suburban women.

Tattooing is recognized by government agencies as both an art form and a profession and tattoo-related art work is the subject of museum, gallery and educational institution art shows across the United States.

By Hoag Levins 
http://tattooartist.com/history.html

 
 
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Tattooing has an integral place in American society.  In recent years, there has been a resurgence in the popularity of American traditional tattoos.  This classic American tattoo style, also known as Americana style, Traditional or Old School (Old Skool), is on the rebound both in the US and in Europe.  Although today’s popular culture places heavy emphasis on contemporary designs and motifs, little attention is given to the history behind the tattoo culture in America.

The Americana style is one of the oldest and most enduring tattoo styles in America today.  Its origins date back to the turn of the 19th century, when body ink was mostly sported by criminals, people in the navy or circus and side show freaks.  This era gave rise to the American tattoo forefathers. 

Although one artist cannot claim credit for single-handedly pioneering the style, a few noteworthy individuals deserve recognition for putting it on the world map.  These individuals include Sam O’Reilly (credited with inventing the first tattoo machine), Cap Coleman and Paul Rogers.  These men were on the scene and setting the foundations of the style well before tattoo icon Norman Keith Collins, aka Sailor Jerry, began plying his craft.

Undoubtedly, Sailor Jerry contributed a great deal to the tattoo industry during his career.  Apart from expanding the tattooist’s pallet by adding new pigments, his analytical approach led to the improvement of the tattooing machine and the introduction of hospital-style sterilization of tattooing equipment. 

Over the past few years, tattooists such as Mike Pike, Bert Krak, Dan Higgs and Ed Hardy have remained faithful to the classic American tattoo style leading to its current popularity worldwide.

Unlike the tribal tattooing style characterized by heavy, black outlines and intricate designs, the Americana style is easily distinguished by simple bold and solid lines with few contrasting colors.  Common motifs include nautical and religious symbols, daggers, skulls, mermaids, women, flowers, anchors, hearts and eagles among others.  These traditional tattoos are now synonymous with simple sophistication and often carry a clear and direct message.

So if you are stumped on which tattoo to get, why not choose an American traditional tattoo design?  It is a choice you are sure not to regret.

By: MaciekV7 May 7, 2013
Tattoo.com

 
 
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It comes as no surprise that President Barack Obama commented on his clever plan to dissuade his daughters from getting tattoos as a means of rebellion; the man has proven to be “modern” and in touch with pop culture from music to sports and all things in between.  Recently, our Commander in Chief was interviewed by NBC’s “Today” where he explained certain pre-emptive measures he and the first lady, Michelle Obama, are taking in order to have his two daughters reconsider any future ink decisions.  


The Presidential Couple hatched out a master plan centered around the threat of national embarrassment.  “If you guys ever decide you’re going to get a tattoo, then mommy and me will get the exact same tattoo in the same place.  And we’ll go on YouTube and show it off as a family tattoo” he said, with a sheepish grin on his face.  As they say, fight fire with fire, or in this case, ink.


Obama’s point is obvious; everything the President and his family does is looked at through a microscope and nothing flies under the radar.  If you recall, the daughters of George W. Bush were cited as minors in possession of alcohol on several occasions which only brought negative publicity to an already troubled presidential campaign.  Ultimately, when Sasha and Malia Obama turn 18, it will be their decision and their consequences to deal with, but we will all surely know about it.


Will the Obama daughters test their father and get inked up when they are of age?  Perhaps they’ll one-up the President and get something totally ludacris permanently engraved on their skin for their parents to replicate.  Or will Barack Obama’s intimidation tactics be successful and make the girls reconsider?

From MaciekV7's blog 

 
 
Don't be this client, lol!! This is not at a Planet Ink Tattoos, but this is pretty funny!
 
 
  1. When receiving a tattoo, your skin is pricked between 50 and 3,000 times per minute by a needle in the tattoo machine. Learn more about how the tattoo machine works.
  1. Tattoo machines have been around since the late 19th century, and surprisingly, they haven't changed much in 100 years. Learn more about the history of tattoo machines.
  1. Most tattoo machines consist of four parts: The needle The tube that holds ink An electric motor A foot pedal to control the movement, similar to how a sewing machine works Learn more about the components of a tattoo machine.
  1. Sterilization and disposable materials are crucial to tattooing, as tattoos are created by thousands of puncture marks to the skin, each of which could become infected. Learn more about the sterilization process.
  1. The autoclave is a popular way to sterilize any tattoo equipment that isn't disposable. A combination of heat, steam and pressure kills all bacteria and organisms to prevent infection. Learn more about autoclaves.
  1. Ancient tattoo methods involved picks, rakes and chisels. In some cases, a soot-covered thread was sewn through the skin. Learn more about early tattoo methods.
  1. Be prepared to shell out some significant dollars for a tattoo. Tattoos under an inch cost between $50 and $100. Imagine what that full-back design would go for. Learn more about tattoo prices.
  1. Though tattoos are sometimes associated with rebellion, uniformity is paramount when it comes to application: Too-deep punctures result in pain and bleeding, while too-shallow ones create uneven lines.Learn more about tattoo application.
  1. The tattoo process has four basic steps: Outlining Shading Color Cleaning and bandaging Learn more about the tattoo process.
  1. Tattoo seekers can expect to feel some pain: The process has been described as similar to bee stings or sunburns. Placement, size, type and artist skill, however, can all make a difference. Learn more about tattoo pain.
  1. Unclean tattooing practices can transmit diseases such as syphilis, hepatitis B and HIV; however, there has yet to be an actual case of HIV being transmitted via a tattoo application. Learn more about tattoo health risks.
  1. Some pigments used in tattoos contain metal, which can cause pain during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test, or even affect the MRI images as a result. Learn more about tattoo pigments.
  1. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not approve, nor regulate, the pigments and inks used for tattoos. In addition, few states regulate tattoo parlors, so it is up to you to find a safe, clean, reputable tattoo artist and parlor. Learn more about getting a tattoo safely.
  1. Get some background information on your tattoo artist. Ask to see that they have a license, and inquire as to their membership status. Tattoo artists don't have to belong to professional trade organizations, but those who do are usually the most up-to-date on information and trends in the industry. Learn more about what questions to ask your tattoo artist.
  1. Look through books of tattoo artists' work, or watch them apply other tattoos. Even if they have all of the proper credentials and follow safety rules, they may not be much of an artist. Learn more about what to look for in a tattoo artist.
  1. After receiving a tattoo, ask your artist if they have a sheet or pamphlet that describes the required aftercare. Infected tattoos can be painful and dangerous. Learn more about tattoo aftercare.
  1. Think carefully beforehand about what kind of tattoo you'd like to have; almost a fifth of people with tattoos in the United States regret getting one, and it's usually because it contains a name. Learn more about choosing a tattoo.
  1. Scabs after a tattoo are OK -- don't pick at them because they should fall off on their own within three weeks -- but if you start to see signs of an infection, see a doctor. Learn more about keeping your tattoo healthy.


From: http://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/beauty/skin-and-lifestyle/tattoo-facts.htm
 
 

Tattoos, once the ultimate rebel stamp, have become routine embellishments — fueling an ink industry that rakes in billions of dollars per year


To ink or not to ink? This week, the American Medical Association published what's considered to be the first scientific survey of tattoo removal, detailing which tattoos are hardest to remove (blue ink) and what factors reduce the odds of erasing the damn thing (smoking). The report is a sure sign that tattoos — once the province of rock stars and ne'er-do-wells — have become thoroughly mainstream. Indeed, today not only are tattoo artists enjoying a robust growth-industry, their counterparts — the tattoo-effacement experts — are busily tending to Americans who regret that faded tribal design encircling their biceps or have discovered that the Chinese character on their wrist has an unwelcome meaning. Here, a numerical guide to America's tattoo obsession:

$2.3 billion 
Annual revenue of the tattoo industry

15,000 
Tattoo parlors in America

21 
Percent of Americans who have a tattoo

23 
Percent of women who have a tattoo

19 
Percent of men who have a tattoo

36 
Percent of 18-to-25-year-olds who have a tattoo

38
 
Percent of 30-to-39-year-olds who have a tattoo

11 
Percent of 50-to-64-year-olds who have a tattoo

50 
Percent of people who think having a tattoo is rebellious

$80 to $100 
Average per hour cost of a tattoo

$150-$350 
Per hour cost of a tattoo in Brooklyn, N.Y.

$200 
Cost of a laser tattoo removal session

10-15 
Sessions needed to remove a tattoo

32 
Percentage increase in tattoo removals over the last year

 
 
 
 
It's easy enough to find a shop where you could get a tattoo on your body in an hour or so, but finding a reputable tattoo shop is what many people getting a tattoo strive to do.

Finding a reputable tattoo shop is really important, because a tattoo will never come off of your body, so making absolutely sure you have found the right place is vital.

Some easy tips for finding a reputable tattoo shop:

If you have friends, family or co-workers that have tattoos you can easily ask them where they got their tattoo, and whether or not their experience was good or bad. People love to talk about their tattoos, so even asking someone you've never met before can strike up a good conversation. One thing I have found, is that whether people love their tattoos or hate them, they are generally really happy to tell you where they got their work done.

The best tattoo shops will be very welcoming and glad to get your business. When you meet a tattoo artist he or she should be very friendly and they shouldn't be trying to intimidate you, at no time should they try to make you get a certain design. In no way should the artist try to push on you to get a more expensive design if you are just after getting something small.

A great way to find a tattoo shop is looking on the internet or a local phone book can also be a good idea to find parlors in your area. The keyword to look for is of course tattoos, once you find some shop simply drive out there and take a look, if you are pleased with what you see, you can come back, you should never rush this decision and take your time looking around for the best shop for you.

 
 
Today you can see that famous people to ordinary ones in the street are sporting this thing. It has become a fashion trend in the world of jewelry today, even become a status symbol for some.

But before you even decide to have any part of your body pierced, know that this is more than a fashion or status symbol for this involves your health. It is just right to consider the following points before going to pierce.

1. Go to a professional piercer. Make sure that his piercing studio has all the documents to prove its legal operation and that he is apt to perform any type of piercing.

2. A piercing is a wound in the skin. It must be taken care of carefully and regularly for proper healing. I can just imagine this nine-year-old deciding to climb a tree, getting the piercing snagged on a branch, ripping it out, getting an infection, ending up in the hospital, and here come the parents with an attorney to sue me.

3. There's a reason tattoo studios are licensed and inspected by local health departments. To keep the clients safe. To prevent the spread of disease. To monitor how tattoo/piercing salons are performing their services. To prevent sickness, illness, and permanent injury to clients.

4.Healing usually takes six to eight weeks but it is better to give your body more time to adjust before you start changing your belly body jewelry. A good after care should be observed and one should follow the instruction of the piercer to the dot for faster healing.

5. Avoid this kind of metal options like Sterling silver for new piercing. Silver tarnish and that's not good with open wound at all. Gold plated jewelry isn't good too because it might cause irritation and infection.

With all things considered above, you are ready to get pierced. Always make sure to go to a professional piercer and if you are not yet sure what metal to use for then ask your professional piercer for any recommendations on the best metal choice to use.

 

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